See also

Family of William BLAKE and Helen GLASS

Husband: William BLAKE (1803-bef1855)
Wife: Helen GLASS (c. 1807-aft1870)
Children: James BLAKE (1826- )
Janet BLAKE (1828- )
Christian BLAKE (1830- )
William BLAKE (1832-1872)
George BLAKE (1836-1892)
Helen BLAKE (1839- )
Agnes BLAKE (1845- )
John BLAKE (c. 1848-1924)
Marriage

Husband: William BLAKE

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William BLAKE

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William BLAKE, william Blake Grave

Name: William BLAKE
Sex: Male
Alt. Name: Hugh William M BLAKE
Father: James BLAKE (1764-1842)
Mother: Christian ANDERSON (1768-1833)
Note: https://www.ancestry.com.au/family-tree/person/tree/52167260/person/162190402099/facts
https://www.ancestry.com.au/family-tree/person/tree/7346946/person/322019863146/facts
https://www.ancestry.com.au/family-tree/person/tree/78283740/person/30400914637/facts
Birth 4 Jul 1803 Aberdour, Fife, Scotland
Death btw 1848 and 1855 (age 44-52) Kirkton, Burntisland, Fife, Scotland

Wife: Helen GLASS

Name: Helen GLASS
Sex: Female
Father: John GLASS ( - )
Mother: Janet ( - )
Note: https://www.ancestry.com.au/family-tree/person/tree/78283740/person/422087880342/facts
Birth c. 1807 Burntisland, Fife, Scotland
Death aft 1870 (age 62-63) Kirkton, Burntisland, Fife, Scotland

Child 1: James BLAKE

Name: James BLAKE
Sex: Male
Birth 26 Sep 1826

Child 2: Janet BLAKE

Name: Janet BLAKE
Sex: Female
Birth 12 Jul 1828

Child 3: Christian BLAKE

Name: Christian BLAKE
Sex: Male
Birth 16 May 1830

Child 4: William BLAKE

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William BLAKE

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William BLAKE

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William BLAKE, william's death certificate

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William BLAKE, Pukekohe & Waiuku Times, Volume 6, Issue 250, 13 February 1917

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William BLAKE, 1872, age 40, William Bake probate

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William BLAKE, william Blake Grave

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Spouse: Jane GIVEN

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Spouse: Jane GIVEN, william Blake Grave

Name: William BLAKE
Sex: Male
Spouse: Jane GIVEN (1831-1891)
Cause of Death: From a burst Blood Vessel
Children: William BLAKE (1857-1884)
David Austin BLAKE (1859-1937)
Euphemia BLAKE (1862-1889)
James BLAKE (1863-1937)
Helen BLAKE (1866-1909)
Ellen BLAKE (1867- )
Note 1: https://www.ancestry.com.au/family-tree/person/tree/78283740/person/30382782240/facts
Note 2: DRURY.—INQUEST.
New Zealand Herald, Volume V, Issue 1427, 13 June 1868, Page 5

Papers Past >
New Zealand Herald >
13 June 1868 >
Page 5 >
DRURY.—INQUEST




DRURY.—INQUEST.

(from our own correspondant.) June 11th. An inquest was held this afternoon at tho Farmers' Hotel, before Charles ITellsop, Ksq , Coroner, upon the body of William Cossey, who died so suddenly yesterday. The following jury were sworn in : — William Hay (foreman), flonry Greenacre, Charles Knapp, George Olarkson, Henry Bull, George Godkin, William Blake, William Cossey, John Clarke, Frederick Molnnis, and Jamea Baker, after which they proceeded to view the body. Tho following witnesses were called :—

James Thomas Cossev, deposed : I reside at Drury and am brother of the deceased. I saw him nlive up to ten minutes to one yesterday. He aud I had been working together, at this time he put his hand to his chest and screamed out Oh, James, "what a pain,' and ran to the door. I followed him and got him on my knees, he heaved three times as if trying to vomit, the first time he brought up a kind of water, the second time something the color of brass, similar to bile, and the third time a small portion of bread. When my other brother, who was out, came back a few minutes after this, I sent him off for Dr. Rayner. I then, with my wife, bathed my brother's temples with cold water. He never spoke after he called out " Oh, James," he was twenty-six years of age, he was never ill since he was in the colony, he seemed in excellent spirits that morning, he was in town on Monday and came back the same night. He was a teetotaller. When I was bathing his temples something came in his throat and seemed to choke him. The doctor came in about twenty minutes after I had sent for him. My brother was not in the habit of lifting heavy weights. I saw him at breakfast that morning and he ate an excellent one. He died about four hours after breakfast.

Frederick Cossey, depoaed: The deceased was my brother ; it was about eight minutes to one yesterday when I left the shop, my-brother appeared to be in good health then; I had been working with him from seven o'clock that morning; I was away from ths shop about three minutes; when I returned my brother was insensible, I found him on my brother's knee, when I got back he was throwing up saliva ; I went for the doctor, but by the time I got my horse my brother William was all but dead. I have never heard him complain or seen him sick. _

William Blake, deposed ' About five minutes past one yesterday I heard that William Cosaey had fallen down in sickness. I ran down to the house to see if I could be of anyhelp. When I got to the house he was on his back in the passage of the workshop. I felt his feet—they were cold. I then felt his chest —there was a little heat. I advised them to apply hot water to his chest, it was done for ten minutes, but at that time he had no pulse, so I thought life was extinct. I have known deceased since I came to the country, and have never heard him complain of sickness. Frederick M. Innis saw the deceased at the same time as Mr. Blake. He was quite dead. Put his hand to his forehead and face—found them quite cold.

William Rayner, deposed: I am a duly qualified medical practitioner and member of the Boysl College of Surgeons, London. I have made a peat mortem examination on the body of William Oossey. I have carefully examined the respective organs of the body and find them generally healthy, with the exception of the heart. The heart presented that form of disease known as atrophy of the heart, it being much below the normal standard in size. I regard that asthe predisposing cause, the exciting cause being a sudden attack of spasm, giving rise to a form of disease known as angina pectoris, to which I attribute the cause of death, producing immediate suffocation. I examined ilie stomach and found it perfectly healthy, but empty. I consider there is nothing inconsistent in the eridence I have heard read over with the cause of death. The Coroner shortly addressed the jury. The jury returned the following verdict:—"That. William Gossey, on the 10th day of June, died of disease of the heart (angina pectoris), by the visitation of God, in a natural way, and not by any violent means whatever."
Birth 6 Jul 1832 Burntisland, Fife, Scotland
Baptism 22 Jul 1832 (age 0) Burntisland, Fife, Scotland
Immigration 19 Oct 1859 (age 27) to Auckland, New Zealand from Liverpool, Lancashire, England
on the "Mermaid". from Liverpool. List published "The Southern Cross", 21/10/1859

For those interested in the details of the voyage faced by the passengers, as well as what is noted below, there is also available on line a 9 page easily read diary written by James Qualtrough, a passenger on the same voyage. He was one of the number who orginated from The Isle of Man. see

Mermaid-Passengers | THE QUALTROUGH FAMILY ...
www.qualtrough.org/the-book/mermaid-passengers.html
Departed Liverpool, England, 11 July 1859; arrived Auckland, New Zealand, ... White and when we (the reporters) left the ship, they (the passangers) were ...

MERMAID
1233 ton ship

Liverpool to Auckland (19 Oct 1859)
Under Captain J. White

STEERAGE

BLAKE William
Blake Jane
Blake William

NOTE; the list of passengers was of course far larger than just this family of 3. There were over 320 passengers.

Source: The Southern Cross, 21 Oct 1859
The New Zealander, 17 Oct 1859
(transcribed by: 0032006)

Above FROM

http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlists/mermaid.html
below from RootsWeb.
freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/.../mermaid1862ALK.htm

Daily Southern Cross, 21 October 1859, Page 2
The Mermaid, Captain James "White, one of the " White Star" line of Liverpool packets, arrived in harbour on Wednesday at 4 a.m., having been signalled during the greater part of the previous afternoon. The Mermaid is a fine vessel of 1326 tons register, built at St. John's, New Brunswick, and an old Melbourne trader. She left Liverpool on the 11th July at 5 p.m., in tow, had fine weather through the Bay of Biscay, and fell in with the N.E. trades in 26 ° 29' The line was crossed on August 12, in 22 ° 50' ; and the Mermaid ran down subsequently to 29 ° 46' W. long. The meridian of the Cape was crossed on the 5th Sept. ; and her highest latitude was 51 ° 55' S. The prevailing winds between the Cape and New Zealand were .from N. E. to N. W. King's Island, off the North Cape, was made on the 15th instant, and the Mermaid has experienced since principally light southerly winds. She anchored off Rangitoto reef at half past 9 on Tuesday evening. Passengers have been very healthy during the voyage; three infants died, and one birth occurred. The passengers speak highly of Captain White and officers, and two addresses presented on the arrival of the ship here will appear in our next.
Below From
Voices from Auckland, New Zealand. "New-Zealander" Office, — Auckland, October 26, 1859

On the 19th instant, the "Mermaid" (Capt. White, 1,233 tons)—the second vessel of the well-known Liverpool "White Star" line—arrived in harbour, with 322 passengers, all in good health and spirits. The immigrants by this noble vessel will form a highly intelligent and eligible addition to our population; among them are a large party from the Isle of Man; and we are glad to learn that another special settlement will be formed out of their number.
Residence 12 Apr 1865 (age 32) Drury, Franklin, Auckland, New Zealand
As published in 'Daily Southern Cross" 12/4/1865, page 6. Freehold property in Drury.
Residence btw 1870 and 1871 (age 37-39) Drury, Franklin, Auckland, New Zealand
FREEHOLD RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY in which he resides.
Death 27 Jun 1872 (age 40) Drury, Franklin, Auckland, New Zealand
Cause: From a burst Blood Vessel
Burial 27 Jun 1872 Drury Presbyterian Cemetery
Australia and New Zealand, Find A Grave Index, 1800s-Current

Child 5: George BLAKE

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George BLAKE, george & Elizabeth Blake Grave

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George BLAKE, George Blake Grave

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George BLAKE, SS Ionic

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George BLAKE, SS Ionic Passenger List with message to brother saying arrived safely 2

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George BLAKE, SS Ionic Passenger List with message to brother saying arrived safely 1

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Spouse: Elizabeth WILLIAMSON

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Spouse: Elizabeth WILLIAMSON

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Spouse: Elizabeth WILLIAMSON

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Spouse: Elizabeth WILLIAMSON, George Blake Grave

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Spouse: Elizabeth WILLIAMSON, 1926 d Elizabeth Blake

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Spouse: Elizabeth WILLIAMSON, 1926 will Elizabeth Blake

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Spouse: Elizabeth WILLIAMSON, SS Ionic

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Spouse: Elizabeth WILLIAMSON, 1926, age 77, Elizabeth Blake Death Notice

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Spouse: Elizabeth WILLIAMSON, SS Ionic Passenger List with message to brother saying arrived safely 1

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Spouse: Elizabeth WILLIAMSON, SS Ionic Passenger List with message to brother saying arrived safely 2

Name: George BLAKE
Sex: Male
Spouse: Elizabeth WILLIAMSON (1849-1926)
Children: Amelia Williamson BLAKE (1866-1948)
William George BLAKE (1868-1957)
John BLAKE (1871-1955)
George Williamson BLAKE (1874-1925)
Jane BLAKE (1876-1959)
James Arcibald BLAKE (1880-1976)
David Williamson BLAKE (1883-1951)
Ronald Birrell BLAKE (1885-1955)
Elizabeth “Lizzie” BLAKE (1888-1980)
Robert Oswald BLAKE (1892-1907)
Note: https://www.ancestry.com.au/family-tree/person/tree/78283740/person/422087874336/facts
Birth 17 Mar 1836 Burntisland, Fife, Scotland
Residence 30 Mar 1851 (age 15) Newrow Street, Burntisland, Fife, Scotland
STABLE BOY for James Williamson
Residence 7 Apr 1861 (age 25) Templehall Cottar House, Abbotshall, Fife, Scotland
MASTER BLACKSMITH, employing George Aitkin aged 18.
Residence 2 Apr 1871 (age 35) Templehall Cottar House, Abbotshall, Fife, Scotland
MASTER BLACKSMITH, employing one man and 2 Apprentices. Married to Elizabeth, 2 children.
Immigration 1884 (age 47-48) to New Zealand from Scotland
Sailed for NZ "Ionic"
Death 2 Jul 1892 (age 56) Pukekohe, Franklin, Auckland, New Zealand

Child 6: Helen BLAKE

Name: Helen BLAKE
Sex: Male
Birth 12 Nov 1839

Child 7: Agnes BLAKE

Name: Agnes BLAKE
Sex: Male
Birth 1845

Child 8: John BLAKE

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John BLAKE, John & Jessie Blake

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John BLAKE, 1924, age 76, 1924 d John Blake

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John BLAKE, Burntisland, Fife, Scotland abt 1920

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John BLAKE, New Zealand, Electoral Rolls, 1853-1981 Blake Pukekohe

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John BLAKE, New Zealand, Cemetery Records, 1800-2007 Drury

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Spouse: Jessie MILL, John & Jessie Blake

Name: John BLAKE
Sex: Male
Spouse: Jessie MILL (1850-1923)
Note: https://www.ancestry.com.au/family-tree/person/tree/78283740/person/30392969395/facts
Birth c. 1848 Burntisland, Fife, Scotland
Residence 30 Mar 1851 (age 2-3) Kirkton, Burntisland, Fife, Scotland
Census Detail
Father is a STOREKEEPER.
Mother and siblings Helen born 1840, Agnes, 1845.
Residence 1896 (age 47-48) Drury, Franklin, Auckland, New Zealand
Electoral Role - Blacksmith
Death 17 Jan 1924 (age 77) Station House, Waihi, New Zealand
Burial 1924 Drury Presbyterian Cemetery

Note on Husband: William BLAKE

https://www.ancestry.com.au/family-tree/person/tree/52167260/person/162190402099/facts

https://www.ancestry.com.au/family-tree/person/tree/7346946/person/322019863146/facts

https://www.ancestry.com.au/family-tree/person/tree/78283740/person/30400914637/facts

Note on Wife: Helen GLASS

https://www.ancestry.com.au/family-tree/person/tree/78283740/person/422087880342/facts

Note on Child 4: William BLAKE (1)

https://www.ancestry.com.au/family-tree/person/tree/78283740/person/30382782240/facts

Note on Child 4: William BLAKE (2)

DRURY.—INQUEST.

New Zealand Herald, Volume V, Issue 1427, 13 June 1868, Page 5

 

Papers Past >

New Zealand Herald >

13 June 1868 >

Page 5 >

DRURY.—INQUEST

 

 

DRURY.—INQUEST.

 

(from our own correspondant.) June 11th. An inquest was held this afternoon at tho Farmers' Hotel, before Charles ITellsop, Ksq , Coroner, upon the body of William Cossey, who died so suddenly yesterday. The following jury were sworn in : — William Hay (foreman), flonry Greenacre, Charles Knapp, George Olarkson, Henry Bull, George Godkin, William Blake, William Cossey, John Clarke, Frederick Molnnis, and Jamea Baker, after which they proceeded to view the body. Tho following witnesses were called :—

 

James Thomas Cossev, deposed : I reside at Drury and am brother of the deceased. I saw him nlive up to ten minutes to one yesterday. He aud I had been working together, at this time he put his hand to his chest and screamed out Oh, James, "what a pain,' and ran to the door. I followed him and got him on my knees, he heaved three times as if trying to vomit, the first time he brought up a kind of water, the second time something the color of brass, similar to bile, and the third time a small portion of bread. When my other brother, who was out, came back a few minutes after this, I sent him off for Dr. Rayner. I then, with my wife, bathed my brother's temples with cold water. He never spoke after he called out " Oh, James," he was twenty-six years of age, he was never ill since he was in the colony, he seemed in excellent spirits that morning, he was in town on Monday and came back the same night. He was a teetotaller. When I was bathing his temples something came in his throat and seemed to choke him. The doctor came in about twenty minutes after I had sent for him. My brother was not in the habit of lifting heavy weights. I saw him at breakfast that morning and he ate an excellent one. He died about four hours after breakfast.

 

Frederick Cossey, depoaed: The deceased was my brother ; it was about eight minutes to one yesterday when I left the shop, my-brother appeared to be in good health then; I had been working with him from seven o'clock that morning; I was away from ths shop about three minutes; when I returned my brother was insensible, I found him on my brother's knee, when I got back he was throwing up saliva ; I went for the doctor, but by the time I got my horse my brother William was all but dead. I have never heard him complain or seen him sick. _

 

William Blake, deposed ' About five minutes past one yesterday I heard that William Cosaey had fallen down in sickness. I ran down to the house to see if I could be of anyhelp. When I got to the house he was on his back in the passage of the workshop. I felt his feet—they were cold. I then felt his chest —there was a little heat. I advised them to apply hot water to his chest, it was done for ten minutes, but at that time he had no pulse, so I thought life was extinct. I have known deceased since I came to the country, and have never heard him complain of sickness. Frederick M. Innis saw the deceased at the same time as Mr. Blake. He was quite dead. Put his hand to his forehead and face—found them quite cold.

 

William Rayner, deposed: I am a duly qualified medical practitioner and member of the Boysl College of Surgeons, London. I have made a peat mortem examination on the body of William Oossey. I have carefully examined the respective organs of the body and find them generally healthy, with the exception of the heart. The heart presented that form of disease known as atrophy of the heart, it being much below the normal standard in size. I regard that asthe predisposing cause, the exciting cause being a sudden attack of spasm, giving rise to a form of disease known as angina pectoris, to which I attribute the cause of death, producing immediate suffocation. I examined ilie stomach and found it perfectly healthy, but empty. I consider there is nothing inconsistent in the eridence I have heard read over with the cause of death. The Coroner shortly addressed the jury. The jury returned the following verdict:—"That. William Gossey, on the 10th day of June, died of disease of the heart (angina pectoris), by the visitation of God, in a natural way, and not by any violent means whatever."

Note on Child 5: George BLAKE

https://www.ancestry.com.au/family-tree/person/tree/78283740/person/422087874336/facts

Note on Child 8: John BLAKE

https://www.ancestry.com.au/family-tree/person/tree/78283740/person/30392969395/facts